Cross-Examinations in UK

Updated on Thursday 28th September 2017

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A cross-examination intervenes when the opposite party in a trial wants the offender to make a testimony in the court of law, as soon as he/she already offered the evidence in “chief”. There are several rules to consider when a cross-examination takes place, a matter our criminal defence solicitors in London can explain in legal terms. The same team can offer legal representation in the court of law when a cross-examination takes place.
 

When is a cross-examination necessary? 


Once the examination-in-chief took place, a cross-examination will be considered, including both offenders and witnesses involved in a case. When a witness is called for a declaration in the court of law, the parties can ask questions, in form of a cross-examination where the order is established before the hearings. The entire procedure can be supervised by our defence solicitors in London if you are a witness in a trial when a cross-examination will take place.
 

Who is entitled to cross-examine in UK?


Witnesses in UK can only be cross-examined by the opposing side in any case. With several exceptions, a witness in the court of law can be examined by the party who called him/her if he/she is considered hostile by the magistrates in the court of law. The right to cross-examine someone comes with a few exceptions which refer to the protection of the minors as witnesses in front of the magistrates, especially if sexual offence charges are involved. We remind that children under 18 who are witnesses in a case must be legally represented in front of the magistrates, a situation where our criminal defence solicitors in London can help.
 

Who cannot be cross-examined in UK?


A witness called by a witness and the one called by a magistrate in the court of law cannot be cross-examined in a criminal case. If for any reason, an eyewitness cannot be part of the trial when a cross-examination will take place, the magistrates will only consider the already given evidence. Also, the evidence-in-chief is admitted if the witness can no longer be part of the trial (he/she deceased).

Additional information about the cross-examination in UK can be obtained from our team of defence solicitors in London if you contact us.

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