How to Solicit a Review of a Crown Court Sentence

Updated on Wednesday 23rd November 2016

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How to Solicit a Review of a Crown Court Sentence Image
The Attorney General’s Office is in charge of reviewing the sentences considered too low in cases of fraud, crime, robbery, drug offences or many others. If you find yourself in this situation and if your sentence has been reviewed, you may solicit help and legal assistance from our criminal defence solicitors in London.


 

Details about the sentence in the UK


A sentence depends entirely on the circumstances of the defence, the factors and the importance of the crime. The UK magistrate will verify the case and will take into consideration if an individual has committed crimes before and if he pleaded guilty or not. The age is a significant aspect of this matter too. A serious crime has aggravating circumstances, for example, a burglary with the use of force. A less serious crime implies mitigating circumstances, such as personal problems with changes of comportment. The Court will identify the case and the circumstances and then a sentence will be made. The defence lawyer in London can provide you with the necessary information and guidance, in order for you to obtain the best possible result, even if the sentence is reviewed.
 

What you need to know about a reviewed sentence in the UK 


The Crown Court in the UK can be asked to review a sentence if the Attorney General’s Office considers it too low, due to the circumstances of a serious crime like theft, money laundering, serious fraud, drug crime or offences related to racist behavior. It is good to know that your sentence may be reviewed even if someone else, not involved in your case, asks this, due to a complaint related to the low sentence.  Our defence solicitors in London can also offer help and guidance if you wish to ask for a sentence review of a suspect at the Crown Court.

 A sentence can be reviewed in about 28 days after the needed information has been received by the Attorney General’s Office, such as the committed misdemeanor, the date when the sentence was issued and the Court and details about the convicted person. The next step is to analyze once again the case, and if other circumstances or details occur in this time, the Attorney General’s Office can change the sentence and send it back to the Crown Court. In this stage, the Court of Law can refuse it or can maintain the initial verdict, if it considers so. 

Please feel free to contact our team of criminal solicitors in London if you have questions about how to solicit a review of a Crown Court sentence in the UK.

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