The Legal Procedures Related to Binding Over Order

Updated on Tuesday 18th July 2017

Rate this article
based on 3 reviews


The Legal Procedures Related to Binding Over Order Image
The binding over order in UK is the power of the magistrate to impose certain conditions to an individual and to make orders to prevent a possible breach of the peace. In other words, the binding over is a protective method adopted when there are reasonable grounds to anticipate a present or a possible serious crime or danger in the future. Our criminal defence solicitors in London can offer comprehensive information about the legal procedures related to the binding over order and can represent you in the court of law.
 

Binding over order in UK


From the beginning, it is good to know that the binding over order in UK does not represent a punishment or a condemnation and cannot be used for previous criminal acts which can repeat in the future. Even more, a binding over order cannot be used by prosecutors who do not have sufficient evidence in a serious offence case, in order to press charges. A binding over order in UK can be imposed on cases of minor assaults, domestic violence, or for cases where both persons implied are culpable, and there is no independent proof to sustain and to offer to authorities. Furthermore, even if a binding over order is not a conviction, this can be inflicted succeeding a sentence for a criminal offence in the UK, where penalties can apply. Such cases can be entirely explained by our criminal solicitors in London, who can also offer comprehensive legal support.
 

What happens if you refuse a binding over order in UK?


If a person refuses a binding over order issued by the court of law in UK, he/she can be sent into custody for no more than six months or until they agree with the decision of the magistrates. Take into consideration that persons with ages between 18 and 21 can be sent to prison if they do not accept the binding over order. As for the minors who refuse a binding over order, they can be sent into custody centers in UK. Please consider that our criminal solicitors in London are able to offer details and legal advice if you have received a binding over order and you need to know the legal aspects in this matter.
 

Justices of the Peace Act 1968


According to the Justices of the Peace Act 1968, the court of law in UK can bind over order any person, in order to keep the peace and to prevent possible misleads. In cases where the conditions related to the binding over order have been breached, the individual must pay a certain amount of money, as a penalty. The same law stipulates that the court of law in UK needs to identify a particular conduct or activity from which a person needs to hold back and to agree on the duration of the order. Our criminal lawyer in UK is able to represent any individual in the court of law if a binding over order has been imposed.

Additional information about the legal procedures related to binding over order can be obtained from our team of criminal defence solicitors in London, so please feel free to contact us at any time.

Comments

There are no comments

Please note that URLs are not allowed in the message.

*
*